Penny Pinching Paleo

We are all on a budget and if you’re not…well…must be nice and can you donate some grass-fed beef my way? Thanks! Anyways, one of the greatest things you can do to save money in the long run is to take care of yourself.

By choosing nutrient dense foods, creating healthy habits, SLEEPING and getting some movement in you are filling up your health tank. Think of it as a savings account, you put all this “money” which is you taking care of yourself consistently and then when you need to take some “money” out, say when you’re sick or super stressed, you have a reserve fund to take from. Make sense? If you have money in the bank it’s a crises you can likely avoid, however, if you have to put it on your credit card…you end up paying for it for longer.

I can not express how important it so to get the best quality food you can afford whenever possible. This might mean you have to cut back on other areas of your life, say getting a manicure once a month instead of every week…or bringing coffee from home, you know the normal budget saving things. I don’t even look at it as a sacrifice but an investment into my future.

Without further ado – here is how I stay paleo on a budget…

  1. Buy a whole a chicken (the BEST quality you can afford) and roast it with whatever root veggies are on sale that week. Now you have an entire dinner but also tons of chicken left over for chicken salad (my favorite) or whatever else you want to turn it into. Save the carcass for  homemade broth, that’ll save you at least $3.99,  and,  it’s way tastier.
  2. Shop the back of the produce section. Usually there is a cart with veggies that the store isn’t able to sell in the normal produce section for whatever reason. Sometimes there are a little banged up but normally I can’t find anything wrong with them.
  3. Eat a lot of eggs. Where else can you find at least 4 meals of protein for less than $5.00 bucks? Bargain in my mind.
  4. Buy the fattier or less desirable cuts of grass-fed meat and USE YOUR SLOW COOKER, it’s magical.
  5. Shop at discount stores for shelf stable stuff. We have Ocean State Job Lot around where I live and I get all my condiments, olives, tuna, spices and tons of other stuff there. They also have Bob’s Red Mill products like coconut and almond flour for much less than Whole Foods or the grocery store. The inventory changes all the time so check back and you can sometimes find hidden organic gems.
  6. I use canned full-fat coconut milk as a coffee creamer…might sound a little strange but it is freakin’ delicious. Also, bonus for the fact that it is much cheaper than the coconut milk creamer sold in the refrigerated section and there is no added sugar or other weird ingredients. I just keep it in a small glass ball jar and a can usually lasts me about a week…YUM!
  7. Grow your own herbs. Herbs can get really expensive and don’t often last long when you buy them at the store. Pick up small pots of whatever herbs you use most often and grow them on your windowsill. I got organic basil and parsley at my local grocery store for $1.99 each and they are still going strong…
  8. This is an obvious one, buy what is on sale. Not only will you save a few bucks but also it will force you to have some variety in your diet. Never a bad thing.

Although it might seem that eating paleo/grain-free is more expensive than the SAD (Standard American Diet) you CAN make it fit into a budget.

For as much as our bodies do for us, providing good, nutrient dense food is the least we can do for it.

Go eat some raw sauerkraut!

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Penny Pinching Paleo

3 thoughts on “Penny Pinching Paleo

    1. My personal definition of a paleo diet is: no grains, legumes or conventional dairy. However, I think everyone needs to figure out what works best for them and that might not be paleo! Whole 9 Life has a great post on what it means…

      Whole9′s Nutrition in 60 Seconds

      We eat real food – meat, fish, eggs, vegetables, fruit, healthy oils, nuts and seeds. We choose foods that were raised, fed and grown naturally, and foods that are nutrient-dense, with lots of naturally occurring vitamins and minerals.

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